Mulled Wine and Murder – Kate P Adams

A Charleton House Mystery, Book Five

Five of five stars

Reading a Charleton House adventure always makes me feel as if I’m getting an authentic slice of old England – even though it’s set in the present day. Adams’ snippets and peeks into the workings of an old English Castle are spot on; she does her research well and thoroughly and we are the beneficiaries of that diligence.

Adams’ writing style has always drawn me into the action, this particular phrase – Charlton House seemed to be at sail on a sea of mist – had even this aphantasic reader seeing the image!

In this episode, we find that Joe has moved on with Ellie, with Sophie trying to make people understand that she really is ok with that. She really is though, and Joyce is proving to be a valuable “assistant” in her sleuthing, so life seems to be smooth sailing.

Until it isn’t. There’s a skeleton found in the pub basement. Only it’s not a recent one. And the current Duke’s ancestor may have been involved in something nefarious. Then there are poison winterberries found in the mulled wine. And suddenly Sophie and crew are delving into life at the time of a previous incarnation of the pub to see if she can make sense of the skeleton. Is there a connection to the berries?

An interesting development in this volume too, DS Harnby seems almost happy to have Sohpie’s input! Has the tide turned?

All in all, Mulled Wine and Murder is a great addition to the Charleton House series, I was through it in less than a day. Which is good and bad, since now we wait IMPATIENTLY for the next installment of “The Life and Times of Sophie Sleuth”. [my nomenclature there!] I highly recommend this one, and if you’re new to the series, you’ll be happy to know it stands alone perfectly well. But do read the others, I guarantee you’ll enjoy them all!

Find Mulled Wine and Murder – and the others – here: https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B08NFJNYV9/

[I was fortunate to receive an Advanced Reader Copy of the book from the author, with no obligation to review. The opinions expressed herein are entirely my own.]

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